Oh yes the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth has worn the same pair of shoes for 50 years and counting. Well i am actually surprised. It rare to see anyone where the same kind of shoes for decades. Hmmm. I am sure no youth of these days would ever try that (Let me know if im wrong.)

The Rayne brand of shoes have been the excellent choice of the royal family especially the queen.

1969: These Rayne shoes are brown, with a short tongue - but the pattern had been set
1969: These Rayne shoes are brown, with a short tongue – but the pattern had been set

 

1975: Summery in Jamaica - the style she'll keep for years, seen here in white
1975: Summery in Jamaica – the style she’ll keep for years, seen here in white

1984: The dress is from another era, but the black patent shoes are becoming a fixture
1984: The dress is from another era, but the black patent shoes are becoming a fixture

Then there’ll be a fitting at the Palace, and  — after any final adjustments, including a clean and polish — they’re ready.

The Queen’s selection — she has worked her way through hundreds of almost identical pairs over the years but circulates about ten pairs at any one time — includes plain black leather, black patent, white leather and beige leather, and three designs of evening shoe in satin, silver and gold. They are all hand-dyed and water-repellent.

1987: Elegant in Spain. Her shoes have since survived the reign of King Juan Carlos
1987: Elegant in Spain. Her shoes have since survived the reign of King Juan Carlos

The heel is always reassuringly chunky and 2¼ in high, with a raised insole to give the royal size 4s an added lift in the arch. If she is likely to be walking on uneven surfaces, the heel will be lower.

But even having them handmade isn’t quite enough to get them fit for a Queen.

Stewart Parvin, who has designed dresses for her for 11 years says that the shoes have to be immediately comfortable and that to achieve this, a member of staff with the same size feet will trot up and down palatial corridors for her until they are suitably broken in.

1990: Derby Day and the Queen is being blown about ¿ but the shoes keep her steady
1990: Derby Day and the Queen is being blown about ¿ but the shoes keep her steady

Parvin says: ‘The Queen can never say: “I’m uncomfortable, I can’t walk any more.” ’

Once she has taken delivery, her dressers Kate or Beverley might also use wooden shoe stretchers to make them more comfortable.

Her shoes have occasionally been ‘worn in’ by Angela Kelly, her devoted personal assistant, as they have almost the same size feet. But now there is the aforementioned junior staff member ‘Cinders’, who is the same size exactly. She wears beige cotton ankle socks when testing the Queen’s shoes, and is only allowed to walk on carpets. The shoes then get one trial run outside to ensure there is no slippage.

Footmen Ian and William are responsible for everyday care, including polishing and storage. After the Queen has worn them, they are aired on shoe trees then stored individually in silk or cotton drawstring bags.

Originally the Queen’s shoes were made by Rayne, a British family firm founded in 1885 to make theatrical shoes for actresses such as Lillie Langtry (Edward VII’s mistress).

1993: Glancing down at her feet ¿ yes, the shoes are still the same¿ at Sandringham
1993: Glancing down at her feet ¿ yes, the shoes are still the same¿ at Sandringham

 

1994: In Russia, in fur. The Soviet Union has collapsed, but the trusty slip-on is eternal
n Russia, in fur, in 1994

 

1996: She has long since dispensed with boxy jackets, but the patent leather remains
1996 :She has long since dispensed with boxy jackets, but the patent leather remains on a visit to a criminal court

 

2002: Co-ordinating with the black fur trim on this fuchsia pink coat on Christmas Day
2002: Co-ordinating with the black fur trim on this fuchsia pink coat on Christmas Day
2004: A jolly Queen steps out in a slightly lower heel as she makes her way to church
2004: A jolly Queen steps out in a slightly lower heel as she makes her way to church
2007: Presidents may come and go ¿ but not the shoes, seen here on a visit to the U.S.
2007: Presidents may come and go ¿ but not the shoes, seen here on a visit to the U.S.
2008: The shoes of Christmas past enjoy yet another festive outing at Sandringham
2008: The shoes of Christmas past enjoy yet another festive outing at Sandringham

Twenty years ago, like most of the British shoe-making industry, Rayne went out of fashion — and production.

Ever loyal, the Queen knighted Eddie Rayne. But she was said to be so distraught at losing her beloved shoemaker that courtiers tracked down a former employee of Rayne, David Hyatt, who, by then, was working for another shoemaker, Anello & Davide. With help from the Palace, Hyatt recovered the Queen’s old lasts from the liquidators.

In 2009, pictured, Her Majesty added contrast to the blaze of red to greet wellwishers in Newmarket
In 2009, pictured, Her Majesty added contrast to the blaze of red to greet wellwishers in Newmarket

 

2012: Another day, another decade ¿ an elegant ensemble for  the Diamond Jubilee
2012: Another day, another decade ¿ an elegant ensemble for the Diamond Jubilee

According to David Hyatt: ‘We supply one or two pairs a year and occasionally renew the tops and re-heel them. The Queen doesn’t waste money. She’s no Imelda Marcos.’

2014: The trusty £1,000 shoes still going strong this week as the Queen visited Belfast
2014: The trusty £1,000 shoes still going strong this week as the Queen visited Belfast

 

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